Daniel S. Sokal, LCSW Psychotherapy and Counseling – Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ’s

Deciding to initiate the process of counseling and therapy can be a difficult and painful process. In order to help patients feel more comfortable and learn about our process, we’ve created the following list of FAQ’s.

Why Start Therapy Now?

You’re at a point in life wondering why patterns keep repeating. How did you get to where you are? You’re feeling ready to sit with your history, to share your story.  It’s time to stop repeating the loop of relationship conflicts, negative behaviors and arguments, you want something to change but are not sure how to start.

How Do I Make An Appointment?

New and existing patients may Book An Appointment Here.

How Do I Pay For Therapy? 

I accept some health insurances, credit cards, checks, flexible spending account cards, health savings account cards, and cash payment at the time of your appointment.

Do You Accept And Bill My Insurance? 

You can quickly and easily verify your benefits here through my billing company O’Brien’s Billing. I accept some insurances both as an in-network and out of network provider (OON).

What Will The First Session Be Like?

It is normal to be nervous and anxious about what therapy will be like, especially getting to and attending the first session. The first session is where you will tell your story, however much you want to share. We will discuss your hopes and aspirations, and how your symptoms operate and get in the way of living the life you want to live.

What Will The Process Of Therapy Be Like?

Together we will work towards building on your inner strengths and abilities to engage with the deeper meanings of everyday tensions. We will start the process of rebuilding frayed relationships and improving your sense of self.

Will Other People Know What We Talk About In Sessions?

The therapy room is a sacred space. Your confidentiality is strictly maintained. Only in rare circumstances, mostly rooted in care and worry, will very specific information be released: issues surrounding mandated reporting, issues surrounding a court mandate (legal mandate by a judge) of release, and issues of a risk to you or others.